User Accounts Migration

Hi everyone,

We are in the process of migrating all user accounts from the Modern Stoicism WordPress site to our new Learn Modern Stoicism site hosted by Teachable.  This is an e-learning site that we will use to deliver Stoic Week, SMRT, and to provide resources such as videos from conferences.

All users of this site should have received three emails recently:

  1. An announcement from this domain (modernstoicism.com) saying that your account is being migrated to our new Learn Modern Stoicism site hosted by Teachable.
  2. A system-generated email from Learn Modern Stoicism (learn.modernstoicism.com) asking you to confirm your email for the account.
  3. An announcement from the new domain Learn Modern Stoicism (learn.modernstoicism.com) explaining the migration process.

All user accounts have now been removed from Modern Stoicism.  If you’re having problems logging into Learn Modern Stoicism just get in touch.  Alternatively, you can just set up a new account on Learn Modern Stoicism.

We’ve been planning to migrate accounts for a long time.  The existing WordPress site was suffering from performance problems as the numbers of users grew.  We currently have nearly 14,000 registered users, which is likely to grow in advance of Stoic Week 2017.

The main benefits of moving to Teachable are:

  1. The site is faster and more stable
  2. It’s more responsive and works better on mobile devices
  3. We have greater capacity to add larger numbers of new users
  4. Videos (hosted by Wistia) will stream faster and be more responsive
  5. We benefit from the e-learning features of Teachable
  6. The email notification system in Teachable works better
  7. There’s also an integrated iOS app for Apple users (an Android app will follow eventually)

I hope that information is of help.  Please get in touch if you have any more questions.

Donald Robertson

Are Stoics Happy? Stoic Week 2016 Report part 2 (of 4) by Tim LeBon

“For what prevents us from saying that the happy life is to have a mind that is independent, elevated, fearless, and unshakeable, a mind that exists beyond the reach of fear and of desire, that regards honour as the only good and infamy as the only evil, and everything else as a trivial collection of things, which come and go, neither subtracting anything from the happy life nor adding anything to it, and do not increase or diminish the highest good? It is inevitable that a man with such a grounding, whether he wills it or not, will be accompanied by continuous cheerfulness and a profound happiness that comes from deep inside him, since he is one who takes pleasure in his own resources and wishes for no joys greater than those of his own heart.”
– Seneca, On the Happy Life 4. (translated J. Davie)

“‘I wonder if I might draw your attention to an observation of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius? [Jeeves] said. “Does anything befall you? It is good. It is part of the destiny of the universe ordained for you from the beginning. All that befalls you is part of the great web.’”
I breathed a bit stertorously. ‘He said that, did he?’
‘Yes, sir.’
‘Well, you can tell him from me he’s an ass.’”
– P.G. Wodehouse The Mating Season

 

Introduction

Are Stoics happy? When reading Seneca, you may become convinced that a profound happiness must accompany anyone who has developed the independent, elevated and fearless mind of a Stoic. The novelist P.G Wodehouse provides a different perspective. Who is right? Armchair philosophising cannot provide the answer. It is an empirical matter and in the twenty-first century we have access to methods of investigation that were not available to the Roman Stoics. For several years the Stoicism Today project has been working on this question – this article provides an update on some of the latest findings.

The focus in this article is what we can learn from the results of the questionnaires given to participants at the start of the Stoic Week that took place between Oct 17th and 23rd, 2016. Stoic Week has become an annual event in which anyone with access to the internet is invited to “live like a Stoic” for a week. To do this participants download and read a free booklet and audio materials carry out Stoic exercises daily and, if they are kind, help us with our research by filling in questionnaires at the start and end of the week.

This year participants completed the SABS scale (the Stoic Attitudes and Behaviours scale v3.0), a measure designed by the Stoicism Today team to measure someone’s level of Stoicism and three validated well-being scales which measure Satisfaction with Life, Flourishing and Positive and Negative emotions respectively. In this way it is possible, by using the statistical method of correlation, to ascertain whether Stoic attitudes and behaviours go with happiness, as Seneca would have us believe – or perhaps not, as P.G. Wodehouse implies.

 

Your questions answered

This year the main findings are being presented as answers to questions people have asked in past years. Detailed facts and figures can be found in the appendices at the end.

Q: Are Stoics happy?
A: Our analysis suggests that in general the more Stoic one is the happier one is too.

Taking an average of the 3 well-being scales, there is a correlation coefficient of .4 between Stoicism and well-being. Given the size of the sample (nearly two thousand), the chances of this association being accidental is less than one in a million.

Of course, correlation does not necessarily imply causation. It could be that the association exists because the happier one is, the more Stoic one is, or possibly something else (such as income) could be driving both higher levels of happiness and Stoicism. However, once this strong correlation between well-being and Stoicism at the start of Stoic Week and a significant increase in well-being during Stoic Week (which has been found to be the case in previous years, this years findings will be reported in part 3 of this report) , it would not be unreasonable to infer some causation going in the direction of practising Stoicism and being somewhat happier. This seems to be true however we define happiness, though we should also note that the association is stronger for flourishing (happiness in the round) than for life satisfaction.

Seneca 1 P.G Wodehouse 0?

 

Q: Hold on, Isn’t Stoicism all about being virtuous and not about happiness? Don’t Stoics go so far as to say that happiness is a “preferred indifferent”. So why are you bothering to do this research?
A: It’s true, the convinced Stoic would say that this finding itself is a preferred indifferent. They would doubtless be pleased that Stoicism goes with happiness, but would argue that this isn’t the main reason you should be Stoic.

However this is not the whole story. We have the testament of Seneca (quoted above) as well as Epictetus who often pointed out that Stoicism leads to greater happiness and more tranquillity. They realised that many of their audience were not convinced Stoics. Practical wisdom necessitated pointing to Stoicism’s positive side-effects (happiness and tranquillity) to win over converts. I would argue that   today we are in much the same situation as the Roman Stoics. Most of our audience are not convinced Stoics either. But their interest may be piqued when by learning that Stoicism may make you happier. Certainly they will also be reassured by learning that Stoicism is unlikely to make you miserable or emotionless. If we would like Stoicism to be promoted in companies, government and within the NHS, these findings about the relationship between Stoicism and well-being become all the more important.

Q: I can believe that Stoics are less unhappy, but you’re not claiming that Stoicism actually goes with positive emotions too, are you?
A: Actually our analysis suggests that Stoicism does go with positive emotions as much as with the reduction of negative emotions.

The SPANE scale allows us to measure the relationship of Stoicism with various emotions, positive and negative. Table 1 shows the correlation coefficient[i] between emotions and Stoicism.

Emotion Correlation with Stoic Attitudes and Behaviours
Contented 0.35
Good 0.32
Positive 0.31
Pleasant 0.30
Negative -0.29
Bad -0.28
Happy 0.28
Sad -0.26
Joyful 0.26
Afraid -0.26
Unpleasant -0.24
Angry -0.24

Table 1 : Correlation of SABS 3.0 scores and SPANE items

So perhaps Seneca is exaggerating only a little when he says that Stoicism leads to “continuous cheerfulness and a profound happiness”

Seneca 2 P.G Wodehouse 0?

 

Q: Are those who know a lot about Stoicism (without practising it) happier?
A: No. There is only a weak association between stated knowledge of Stoicism and average well-being (a correlation co-efficient of about .1) , whereas it’s nearly four times higher for people who practise Stoicism. 

Q: Which has more impact on happiness, Stoic behaviours or attitudes?
A: Behaviours are significantly more impactful – a coefficient of .38 as opposed to.29 for attitudes.

Q: You previously published a report on the demographics of Stoic Week 2016. Can you now tell us anything about which groups are most and least Stoic?
A: Yes, absolutely, what would you like to know?

Q: Do you get more or less Stoic as you get older?
A: Interestingly, there seems to be quite a strong relationship between age and Stoicism. The under 18s (admittedly a very small group) were by far the least Stoic. The over 55s were the most Stoic and in general the older people are, the more Stoic they are. The average SABS scores for each age group are as follows:

Age Average SABS score
over 55 168.6
46-55 165.3
36-45 165.3
26-35 162.10
18-25 159.00
Under 18 148.50

Table 2: Relationship between Age and degree of Stoicism

 

Q: Which area of the world is most Stoic?
A: The Americas win . The UK (stiff upper lip notwithstanding) trails the field.

Region Average SABS score
USA 165.9
South America 165.4
Canada 163.7
Europe 162.1
Australia 161.5
Africa 161.2
Asia 160.1
UK 158.7

 Table 3: Relationship between geographic region and degree of Stoicism

 

Q: Are men or women more Stoic?
A: Our data suggests that men are marginally more Stoic, averaging 164.5 on the SABS scale as opposed to 161.5 for women.

Q: In what ways are people most Stoic?
A: The items which score highest are given in table 4 below.

No. SABS Item Average score (0-7)
5 Peace of mind comes from abandoning fears and desires about things outside our control. 5.97
8 The only things truly under our control in life are our judgements and voluntary actions 5.78
2 It doesn’t really matter what other people think about me as long as I do the right thing 5.65
10 Virtue (or human excellence) consists in perfecting our rational nature, through cultivating wisdom 5.59

Table 4:  The ways in which participants are most Stoic

 

Q: If you had to ask one question to find out if someone was Stoic that didn’t mention the word “Stoic” what should it be?
A: Surprisingly, I should ask them whether they believe that “Recognising that only virtue matters enables me to face life’s transience and my approaching death” (item 26). This has a correlation coefficient of .6 with the SABS scale as a whole, higher than any other SABS item.

Q: Surely PG. Wodehouse was right about something? You have to agree that there are some parts of Stoicism which seem pretty implausible these days – like destiny and “the great web”. Does your research shed any light on this?
A: It is indeed possible to dig deeper and find the associations between specific elements of Stoicism and well-being. Table 5 below shows the items most associated with well-being.

No SABS Item

(non-Stoic items in italics, these are reverse scored)

 

 

Theme

Correlation with average well-being
22 I spend quite a lot of time dwelling on what’s gone wrong the past or worrying about the future Non-Stoic Rumination and worry (reverse scored) 0.47
27 I do the right thing even when I feel afraid Stoic Courage 0.31
24 When an upsetting thought enters my mind the first thing I do is remind myself it’s just an impression in my mind and not the thing it claims to represent Cognitive Distancing 0.29
31 When making a significant decision I ask myself “What really matters here?” and then look for the option that a good and wise person would choose Stoic Practical Wisdom 0.26
19 I try to contemplate what the ideal wise and good person would do when faced with various misfortunes in life Ideal Stoic Advisor 0.24
13 I consider myself to be a part of the human race, in the same way that a limb is a part of the human body. It is my duty to contribute to its welfare Stoic Humanity Connected 0.24
25 Viewing other people as fellow-members of the brotherhood of humankind helps me to avoid feeling anger and resentment Stoic Brotherhood on Humankind 0.24
11 I think about my life as an ongoing project in ethical development Stoic Ethical Development 0.23
28 I care about the suffering of others and take active steps to reduce this ( Stoic Compassion 0.23
23 I make an effort to pay continual attention to the nature of my judgments and actions Stoic Mindfulness 0.22
17 If I was honest I’d have to admit that I  often do what is enjoyable and comfortable rather than doing what I believe to be the right thing Non-Stoic Short- term hedonism (reverse scored) 0.22
26 Recognising that only virtue matters enables me to face life’s transience and my approaching death Stoic coping with death 0.21
32 I sometimes have thoughts or urges it would be unwise to act on, but I usually realise this and do not act on them Stoic Self Control 0.20
6 If bad things happen to you, you are bound to feel upset Non-Stoic Upset is Inevitable (reverse scored) 0.20
21 I treat everybody fairly even those I don’t like or don’t know very well Stoic Fairness 0.20

Table 5:   SABS 3.0 Items most associated with well-being
As in previous years, the SABS with by far the strongest association with well-being (however it is measured) item 22 , asking about ruminating and worrying. Stoic virtues also do very well, with courage, practical wisdom , compassion, self-control and fairness all scoring highly. Cognitive distancing (item 24) scores well, as does using the Stoic Ideal Advisor and items to do with seeing humanity as connected and Stoic Cosmopolitanism.

No SABS Item

(non-Stoic items in italics, these are reverse scored)

Theme Correlation with average well-being
16 I often contemplate the smallness and transience of human life in relation to the totality of space and time View from Above 0.09
10 Virtue (or human excellence) consists in perfecting our rational nature, through cultivating wisdom Virtue is Wisdom 0.10
8 The only things truly under our control in life are our judgements and voluntary actions What we can control 0.11
5 Peace of mind comes from abandoning fears and desires about things outside our control Focussing on what we can control 0.13
14 The cosmos is a  single, wise, living  thing Wise Cosmos 0.13

Table 6: SABS 3.0 Items least associated with well-being

 

The above 5 items all have a positive association with well-being, but it is fairly weak relationship. Contemplating the smallness and transience of human life in relation to the totality of space and time (item 16) as in the View from Above is not especially associated with well-being, despite the popularity of the View from Above meditation. Item 14, “The Cosmos is a single, wise living thing” most closely resembles the Stoic idea satirised by PG. Wodehouse. To be fair to Wodehouse it is one of the least strong predictors of well-being, although it is still a positive association. Perhaps on this one point, we should concede a tie.

The final score – Seneca 3 PG. Wodehouse 1

[i] A correlation coefficient of 1 would indicate a perfect relationship, 0 no relationship at all – a negative number indicates an inverse relationship

For a PDF file of the full report, including appendices, click here.

Tim LeBon can be contacted via email on tim@timlebon.com. His website is http://www.timlebon.com

'Stoicism Today: Selected Writings Vol. II' Available for Free During Stoic Week

‘Stoicism Today: Selected Writings Vol. II’ Available for Free During Stoic Week

Until Friday 21st October, the Kindle digital version of Stoicism Today: Selected Writings Vol. II is available for free.

For Amazon UK, click here. For Amazon US, click here.

The contents are set out in the post here detailing the release.

About the book: Stoicism, the classical philosophy as a way of life practised by the Greeks and Romans, continues to resonate in the modern world. With over forty essays and reflections, this book is simultaneously a guide to practising Stoicism in your own life and to all the different aspects of the modern Stoic revival. You will learn about Stoic practical wisdom, virtue, how to relate wisely to others and the nature of Stoic joy. You will read of life-stories by those who practise Stoicism today, coping with illness and other adversities, and of how Stoicism can be helpful in many areas of modern life, from cultivating calm in the online world to contributing new solutions to the environmental crisis. And, just like the ancient Stoics did, key questions modern Stoics often ask are debated such as: Do you need God to be a Stoic? Is the Stoic an ascetic? Containing both practical wisdom and philosophical reflection, this book – the second in the Stoicism Today series – is for anyone interested in practising the Stoic life in the modern world.

Stoic Week 2016 Starts Monday!

cropped-socrates-v1

Today as this post appears, STOICON 2016 will very shortly be starting in New York City.  It provides one of the high points of the year for the worldwide Modern Stoicism community.  STOICON is not only a wonderful conference with a lineup of engaging speakers providing talks, workshops, and discussions, but it also effectively kicks off International Stoic Week 2016!

 

The Stoic Week Course

What we might call the “main main event”, the entirely FREE online Stoic Week class – providing a beautiful new class site, complete with handbook, audio files, forums for discussion, just to mention a few features – is still enrolling (so, if you’re finding out about this late, don’t fret about it – there’s still time for you to sign up and get in the class!)  It starts on Monday, October 17, and ends on Sunday, October 23.

Having participated in the class myself, I highly recommend it to anyone.  As a teacher and a scholar, I can attest that what you’re getting in this this one-week course Donald Robertson has designed and developed is a brilliant adaptation of classic Stoic philosophy to the context of modern life – precisely the sort of thing the ancient Stoics would be doing were they around to do so today.  It’s eminently accessible for beginners, but has a lot to offer intermediate and expect-level students and practitioners.  I know that I learn quite a bit doing the course myself each year.  So if you’re someone who reads this blog, this is definitely a course you’ll want to take.

Institutions or Organizations Engaging In the Class

The Stoic Week online class offers opportunities to meet, learn, and interact with people all over the world.  In certain locations, there is also another great opportunity, provided by local organizations or institutions, to work through the Stoic Week class together.  At present, here are the organizations and institutions that

Grand Valley State University Classics Department – the contact person is Peter Anderson

Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania – the contact person is Andrew Winters

Marist College Honors Program – the contact person is James Snyder

Bates College – the contact person is Michael Hanrahan

Manchester Stoics Meetup – the contact person is Brenda Lanigan

Brisbane Stoics Meetup – the contact person is Alex Magee

In-Person Events:

There are several events already scheduled during Stoic Week itself to commemorate, celebrate, and continue building community.  If you know of any other events that belong on this list, feel free to contact me, or even better, enter them into this form.  I’ll be updating this post over the course of Stoic Week, to include any new events that come to my attention.

16 October, 2 PM: Post-STOICON/Pre-Stoic Week Meetup (New York City, USA). To celebrate the end of STOICON ’16 and the beginning of Stoic Week ’16, the New York City Stoics Meetup will host a Stoic Walking tour through parts of NYC, with wha promise to be some engaging thematic conversations held along the route. – the organizer/contact person is Greg Lopez.

16 October, 3 PM: Stoicism and Love (London, UK).  The London Stoics Meetup will be hosting a discussion on that very topic (the theme for Stoic Week this year) – the contact person/organizer is Carmello Di Maria.

18 October 12:00 PM:  Stoicism Across the Disciplines: A Panel Discussion (Lewiston, ME, USA) – Bates College faculty will lead an informal discussion of Stoicism across intellectual disciplines at the Benjamin Mays Center- the organizer/contact person is Michael Hanrahan.

18 October, 6:00 PM:  Struggling With Anger? Useful Stoic Perspectives and Practices (Milwaukee, WI, USA).  For local residents of my home city (a place where it’s clearly needed), I’ll be providing the same workshop I’m leading out at STOICON – the organizer/contact person is me, Greg Sadler.

19 October, 5:00 PM: Vidas Estoicas (Bogata, Columbia)  The members of the research group, Peiras, will be providing a discussion focused on classical Stoicism, its doctrines and figures, and its potential for transforming contemporary everyday life at the Edificio de Posgrados de Ciencias Humanas, Salón Oval, Universidad Nacional, Miércoles – the organizer/contact person is Andrea Lozano Vasquez.

19 October, 7:30 PMWhat is The Place for Stoicism in Today’s Society? (Oxford, UK).  The Philosophy In Pubs, Oxford Meetup is hosting a discussion with Daniel Robertson about Stoicism Today – the organizer/contact person is Ben Clark.

20 October, 7:00 PM: Stoic Week Discussion (Slippery Rock, PA, USA)  Professor Andrew Winters will be discussing with the public what it is like to live as a Stoic in a modern world – the organizer/contact person is Andrew Winters

20 October, 6:30 PM: Discussing Stoic Daily Habits (Manchester, UK). The Manchester Stoic Meetup will be holding its monthly discussion, discussing precisely that, daily habits that help one live the Stoic life – the organizer/contact person is Brenda Lanigan.

20 October, 6:00 PM It’s Stoic Week: When Should I Assent? (Chicago, IL, USA). The Chicago Philosophy Meetup is having a session about Stoicism – the organizer/contact person is Ivan.

22 October, 2:00 PM-7:30 PM: Stoic Guidance for Troubled Times (London, UK). A smaller, but looking-to-be-excellent STOICON conference at Queen Mary University, with presentations by Jules Evans, Christopher Gill, Tim LeBon, Donald Robertson, and Gabrielle Galuzzo – the organizer/contact person is Jules Evans.

23 October, 5:00 PM: Stoic Week Wrap-Up (New York City, USA).  The New York City Stoics Meetup will host a meeting for an hour of open discussion and followup – the organizer/contact person is Greg Lopez.

23 October, 2:00 PM, Stoic Week Catch-Up (Brisbane, Australia).  The Brisbane Stoics will also be hosting a meeting to discuss and compare experiences from Stoic Week – the organizer/contact person is Alex Magee

The Perfect Beginners Guide to Applied Stoicism?

Stoic Week 2016 begins on 17th October but you should enrol in advance now to read the materials beforehand in preparation.

Stoic Week HandbookStoic Week is a free online course that will teach you how to apply the concepts and techniques of ancient Stoicism to your daily life. It’s designed for complete beginners, although many experienced students of Stoicism also take part each year. Stoic Week is now in its fifth year. Last year over 3,400 people from around the world took part. It consists of an online Handbook with readings, audio recordings of meditation exercises, and practices, that you follow for seven days. There are also multiple offline versions of the Handbook, for use on e-readers and other mobile devices.

The Stoic Week materials have been carefully developed by Stoicism Today, a multi-disciplinary team of academic philosophers, classicists, psychologists and cognitive therapists, including several well-known authors in the field. They’re revised each year in response to feedback from thousands of participants. Just visit our website below, create an account, and click the Enrol button on the front page to register in advance for the course. Online course materials become available on 10th October this year, so you can read them in advance. Stoic Week itself will officially begin on 17th October. Will you be taking part? Please feel free to comment below if you have any questions…

http://modernstoicism.com/

Welcome to the New Modern Stoicism

Welcome to the new, improved Modern Stoicism website.

Stoic Week 2016Welcome to the new Modern Stoicism website, for Stoic Week!

We’ve migrated the existing modernstoicism.com website from Moodle to WordPress.  We hope this new, improved version of the site will make your experience better during Stoic Week 2016.  Stoic Week begins on 17th October this year, but you can enrol right now to make sure you get notifications, etc.

If you were previously registered on Modern Stoicism you should receive an automatic email with a special hyperlink, inviting you to reset your password.  Your username will be the same, although if you previously authenticated with Google+ you may just have a generic username like “social_user_12”.  (You can’t change your username on WordPress but if you want you can just create a new account.)

If you didn’t receive an email and want to log into your account, you should just use the lost password feature to reset your password.  Remember to check your spam folder for emails and add our domain (modernstoicism.com) to your email client’s safe-sender list, if possible.

Thanks once again for your support,

Donald Robertson

Stoic Week Is Coming!

Stoic Week Is Coming!

by Greg Sadler

cropped-socrates-v1

 

One of the high points to the year in the growing modern Stoic movement is International Stoic Week.  This year, Stoic Week runs from Monday, October 17 to Sunday, October 23, preceded by the STOICON conference in New York City on Saturday, October 15. Each year has seen growing participation worldwide in the free online Stoic Week class.  There are also a number of events and other ways in which people and institutions will be marking this international celebration of all things Stoic.

As more information about additional events, activities, and online resources related to Stoic Week becomes available, we will add them to our list and publicize them here in a second post that will appear just before Stoic Week begins. If you are hosting something Stoicism-related, and would like to let us know about it, here is the place to enter the information.

Here below is a not-yet-comprehensive list for Stoic Week 2016. Hopefully everyone interested in modern Stoicism can find at least one event near them or online in which they can participate, meet up with others who share their interests, and learn more about Stoic thought and practice!

The Stoic Week Class

17-23 October: Stoic Week Online Class – This is the one that got Stoic Week itself started! A free, online, week-long class hosted and developed by Donald Robertson (with contributions from Stoicism Today project members and many others), updated and improved each year.   Click here to find out more or to register.

Institutions or Organizations Engaging In the Class (so far)

The Stoic Week online class offers opportunities to meet, learn, and interact with people all over the world.  In some places there is also another great opportunity, provided by local organizations or institutions, to work through the class together.  At present, here are the ones we know of (if your institution or organization is doing this, and not on the list, contact me and I’ll make sure you get into the list).

Grand Valley State University Classics Department – the contact person is Peter Anderson

Marist College Honors Program – the contact person is James Snyder

Manchester Stoics Meetup – the contact person is Brenda Lanigan

Brisbane Stoics Meetup – the contact person is Alex Magee

 

In-Person Events (so far)

There are several public events scheduled during Stoic Week itself to commemorate, celebrate, and continue building community.   Here are the ones we’ve been able to find out about:

16 October, 2 PM: Post-STOICON/Pre-Stoic Week Meetup (New York City, USA). To celebrate the end of STOICON ’16 and the beginning of Stoic Week ’16, the New York City Stoics Meetup will host a Stoic Walking tour through parts of NYC, with wha promise to be some engaging thematic conversations held along the route. – the organizer/contact person is Greg Lopez.

18 October, 6 PM:  Struggling With Anger? Useful Stoic Perspectives and Practices (Milwaukee, WI, USA).  For local residents of my home city (a place where it’s clearly needed), I’ll be providing the same workshop I’m leading out at STOICON – the organizer/contact person is me, Greg Sadler.

20 October, 6:30 PM: Discussing Stoic Daily Habits (Manchester, UK). The Manchester Stoic Meetup will be holding its monthly discussion, discussing precisely that, daily habits that help one live the Stoic life – the organizer/contact person is Brenda Lanigan

22 October, 2 PM-7:30 PM: Stoic Guidance for Troubled Times (London, UK). A smaller, but looking-to-be-excellent STOICON conference at Queen Mary University, with presentations by Jules Evans, Christopher Gill, Tim LeBon, Donald Robertson, and Gabrielle Galuzzo – the organizer/contact person is Jules Evans.

 

Several Other Events Before Stoic Week

There are also some other Stoicism-connected events scheduled prior to Stoic Week that might be of interest.

30 September 7:30 PMUntroubled by Adversity: Epictetus (Cambridge, UK). The Cambridge Annual Lecture, The School of Economic Science, a lecture by Christine Lambie

10 October, 3:00 PM: Prohairesis in Epicetus’ Stoic Moral Theory (Milwaukee, WI, USA).  I’ll be giving a close reading workshop at Marquette University as part of the Midwest Seminar in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy.

10 October, 6:30 PM: The Obstacle Is The Way, part 3 (Orlando, FL, USA). Orlando Stoic Meetup will be continuing their ongoing discussion of Ryan Holiday’s work, The Obstacle Is The Way – the organizer/contact person is Dan Lampert.