Your favourite Stoic Exercises 2) The View From Above

The second most useful Stoic Exercise averaging  a 4.2 star rating (out of five) was the View from Above

This is the description from the Stoic Booklet 

Key text: Marcus Aurelius, Meditations, 7.48.

 ‘A fine reflection from Plato. One who would converse about human beings should look on all things earthly as though from some point far above, upon herds,

armies, and agriculture, marriages and divorces, births and deaths, the clamour of law courts, deserted wastes, alien peoples of every kind, festivals, lamentations, and
markets, this intermixture of everything and ordered combination of opposites.’

The Exercise:

The ‘View from Above’ is a guided visualization which is aimed at
instilling a sense of the ‘bigger picture’, and of understanding your role in wider
community of humankind. Continue reading “Your favourite Stoic Exercises 2) The View From Above”

Your favourite Stoic Exercises 3) Mindfulness of the Ruling Faculty (prosoche)

One of the most aspects of Stoic week were the Stoic exercises. Many of these were adapted from Epictetus’s Enchiridion  by Donald Robertson, whose has a new book on Stoicism out next year.

So which Stoic exercises proved most useful and most popular. The votes are now in, and over the next few days we will reveal the answers.

Deemed third most useful was Mindfulness of the Ruling Faculty (Prosoche) which averaged  a 4.1 star rating (out of five)

This is the description from the Stoic Booklet

 Mindfulness of the Ruling Faculty (prosoche). Identify with your essential
nature as a rational being, and learn to prize wisdom and the other virtues as the chief
good in life. Continue reading “Your favourite Stoic Exercises 3) Mindfulness of the Ruling Faculty (prosoche)”

Ten things we might learn from Stoic Week

The answers are all in and there’s a lot of interesting responses to the Stoic Week questionnaires . The results will be posted on this site soon  can now be read here. As a taster and teaser, here are some of the questions to which we hope Stoic Week will provide answers.

  1. Did participating in Stoic week lead to a change  in well-being?

2) Did participants increase their knowledge of Stoicism? Do they want to learn more about Stoicism?

3) Were some Stoic exercises more popular and more useful than others? If so which ones were perceived as being the best?
4) Is Stoicism (as experienced in Stoic week) more effective at reducing distress or facilitating positive emotions. Or does it do both equally?

5) Does Stoicism help with some aspects of life satisfaction (such as accepting what has happened) much more than others? If so, which ones?

6) Does Stoicism help with some aspects of flourishing (such as meaning and purpose) much more than others.? If so, which ones can it help most with?
7) Does Stoicism help with reducing some negative emotions (such as anger)  more than others. If so, which ones?

8) Did Stoic Week  help people improve relationships, become a better person or becoming wiser? What other benefits did participants notice?

9) What was it like to be part of Stoic Week?

  • How satisfied were participants with Stoic week?
  • How did participants use social media?
  • How would participants like to take their own experience forward ?
  • How did participants find the booklet?
  • How did participants find the web site?

10) Would further research be worthwhile? What are the most interesting possibilities that could be part of Stoic fortnight in 2013?

Roundup of Stoic Week in the Press and Blogs

Many, many thanks go to all those who took part in the Stoic week, and especially those who have given very useful feedback for our next Stoic experiment in the spring!

Over the next few days, some interesting results from this feedback will be posted on the blog. In the meantime, here is a roundup of press interest in Stoic Week, and also some thoughtful (and inspiring) blog posts:

Guardian, ‘Be Stoic for a Week (stiff upper lip not required)’, Patrick Ussher

Guardian, ‘A Reminder that Stoicism can be Divine’, Mark Vernon

Independent, ‘Why are we so obsessed with therapy?’, Julian Baggini

Response to ‘Why are we so obsessed with therapy’, Jules Evans

Review of Stoic Week, by Chris at Simple Resilience

Stoic Week and a Trip to ER, by Joe Callahan at Agathoi

Stoic Week at the Thoughtful Writer 

Stoic Week on Gill Garratt’s blog

And a Youtube playlist of all the video diaries posted during the week

Roundup and New Poll: "What Next?"

Roundup of recent posts and new poll: “What next?”

Roundup of Recent Posts
Plus New Poll: What Next?

Well done students of Stoicism!  Make sure you complete the measures again, though.  We need your lovely data to make #Stoicweek work.  Today’s statistics:

  • We had over 8,000 hits on the Stoicism Today website during Stoic Week alone!
  • About 140 people reported they were participating in the study.
  • Over 1,100 people have now viewed the original Youtube Video of the workshop at Exeter University organised by Prof. Gill.
  • We have also acquired over 160 new Twitter (@Stoicweek) followers during the week.
  • Over 120 people commented on The Guardian article by Patrick about Stoic Week.
  • Over a fourteen Youtube video diaries have been uploaded by Stoic Week participants.
  • Over 380 people have voted so far in the poll “Who is your favourite Stoic?“.

What next, though?  You can vote in the poll below (up to three choices) for any ancient philosophy you fancy doing as an alternative to #Stoicweek in the future.  Underneath is a roundup of recent posts in case you missed anything…

Have you missed anything important?

End of Week Scales and Feedback Questionnaire

Don’t forget to retake the surveys below for analysis, and also to take the general feedback questionnaire. Your responses will be really helpful for designing the Stoic Fortnight in Spring 2013. Continue reading “End of Week Scales and Feedback Questionnaire”

Day 6 of Living the Stoic Life!

Day six of Stoic Week: What done amiss? What done? What duty left undone?

Six Days into the Study!

Chrysippus
Chrysippus

We’re reaching the end of the study.  Keep up the good Stoic work, though! Some facts and figures…  We set up a new Twitter account for @Stoicweek where we’ve been posting regular snippets and links.  From zero followers at the start of the week, it now has nearly 150.  You can also see a lot of chat using the Twitter hashtag #Stoicweek. The poll we set up “Who is your favourite Stoic?” has actually had the largest response with nearly 370 people having voted so far.How goes it, though?  What have you learned about yourself?  What problems have you encountered?  What faculties or virtues has nature provided you with to deal with its demands over the week?

What done amiss?  What done?  What duty left undone?

Continue reading “Day 6 of Living the Stoic Life!”