Full chapter from Keith Seddon's Stoic Serenity on 'What is in Our Power'

Our five part special series which encouraged readers to explore Epictetus’ key maxim ‘what is in our power and what is not’ has just ended. It might now be handy to have a PDF of the whole chapter, which is uploaded¬†here.

What is in Our Power, Part Five: An Exploratory Course by Keith Seddon

In our final part of our special series from Keith Seddon’s course Stoic Serenity, you can engage in two exercises to reflect on how you have applied and can apply Epictetus’ advice on what is in your power and what is not to your life.

Click below for the exercises!¬†If you can, take 15 minutes to go through the exercises and please post below your reflections on this key Stoic maxim, and write about your overall thoughts on Epictetus’ approach.¬†Is ‘knowing what is in our power and what is not’ at the core of Stoic philosophical practice?

What is in Our Power, Part Five

Epictetus 

More about Keith Seddon &¬†Stoic Serenity: Keith Seddon is director of the MA and PhD programmes in Ancient Philosophy at Warnborough College, Ireland. He is a freelance academic and writer, who started the¬†‘Stoic Foundation’¬†in 2000, an educational trust, offering advice, support and a¬†correspondence course¬†(on which his book¬†Stoic Serenity,¬†from which our extract is taken, is based) in practical Stoic philosophy to anyone interested in taking up Stoicism as a philosophy to live by. Our thanks go to Keith for allowing his work to be reproduced on this blog.

What is in Our Power, Part Four: An Exploratory Course by Keith Seddon

In Part Four (of Five) of our series in which Keith Seddon explores the key Stoic theme of what is in our power and what is not, Keith discusses how it is that a Stoic can act wisely once he or she understands what is in his power. This is called the ‘reservation clause’.

Click below to find out more! If you can, take 15 minutes to go through the exercises and please post below your reflections on this key Stoic maxim!

What is in Our Power, Part Four

Part Five will be posted on Saturday.

More about Keith Seddon &¬†Stoic Serenity: Keith Seddon is director of the MA and PhD programmes in Ancient Philosophy at Warnborough College, Ireland. He is a freelance academic and writer, who started the¬†‘Stoic Foundation’¬†in 2000, an educational trust, offering advice, support and a¬†correspondence course¬†(on which his book¬†Stoic Serenity,¬†from which our extract is taken, is based) in practical Stoic philosophy to anyone interested in taking up Stoicism as a philosophy to live by. Our thanks go to Keith for allowing his work to be reproduced on this blog.

What is in Our Power, Part Three: An Exploratory Course, by Keith Seddon

In part three of our series from Keith Seddon’s book Stoic Serenity, exploring the core theme in Stoicism of ‘what is in our power and what is not’, you can further reflect on the theme in further exercises as to how this applies to your life.

So click below to read more! If you can, take 15 minutes to go through the exercises and please post below your reflections on this key Stoic maxim!

What is in Our Power, Part Three

Part four will be uploaded on Thursday.

 

More about Keith Seddon &¬†Stoic Serenity: Keith Seddon is director of the MA and PhD programmes in Ancient Philosophy at Warnborough College, Ireland. He is a freelance academic and writer, who started the¬†‘Stoic Foundation’¬†in 2000, an educational trust, offering advice, support and a¬†correspondence course¬†(on which his book¬†Stoic Serenity,¬†from which our extract is taken, is based) in practical Stoic philosophy to anyone interested in taking up Stoicism as a philosophy to live by. Our thanks go to Keith for allowing his work to be reproduced on this blog.

What is in our Power and What is Not, Part One: An Exploratory Course, by Keith Seddon

In our first excerpt, Keith Seddon discusses the background to the core Stoic idea of the importance of understanding what is in our power and what is not,¬†which was at the heart, in particular, of Epictetus’ whole teaching programme. Within the maxim, there is considerable depth, much more than a first glance might suggest….

So click here to read part one! Tomorrow, part two will be uploaded, which will explore key passages that discuss the theme in depth, as well as an exercise to try.

Please post below your reflections on this key Stoic maxim!

What is in Our Power: Part One

Epictetus

More about Keith Seddon &¬†Stoic Serenity: Keith Seddon is director of the MA and PhD programmes in Ancient Philosophy at Warnborough College, Ireland. He is a freelance academic and writer, who started the¬†‘Stoic Foundation’¬†in 2000, an educational trust, offering advice, support and a¬†correspondence course¬†(on which his book¬†Stoic Serenity,¬†from which our extract is taken, is based) in practical Stoic philosophy to anyone interested in taking up Stoicism as a philosophy to live by. Our thanks go to Keith for allowing his work to be reproduced on this blog.

 

What is in Our Power and What is Not: A Short Exploratory Course of the Key Stoic Idea, by Keith Seddon

From tomorrow, we’ll be posting a series of five excerpts over the next week from Keith Seddon’s¬†Stoic Serenity: A Practical Course on Finding Inner Peace,¬†focussing on the theme of ‘what is in our power and what is not’, which was a core part of Epictetus’ approach to understanding Stoic philosophy. Indeed, for Epictetus, it was arguably the best ¬†‘gateway’ into Stoic philosophy for his students.

These excerpts will include recommended passages from Stoic authors to read on the theme, and exercises you can do to implement Stoic advice. The idea is that readers of the Stoicism Today blog might like to take 10 or 15 minutes to do the exercises from each excerpt. And please do write in the comments below how the exercises are going, and any reflections on the effectiveness of approaching philosophy as a way of life from Epictetus’ angle of ‘knowing what is in your power and what is not’!

With thanks to Keith Seddon for allowing this chapter to be reproduced on the blog.

Stoic Serenity

More about Keith Seddon &¬†Stoic Serenity:¬†Keith Seddon is director of the MA and PhD programmes in Ancient Philosophy at Warnborough College, Ireland. He is a freelance academic and writer, who started the¬†‘Stoic Foundation’¬†in 2000, an educational trust, offering advice, support and a¬†correspondence course¬†(on which his book¬†Stoic Serenity,¬†from which our extract is taken, is based) in practical Stoic philosophy to anyone interested in taking up Stoicism as a philosophy to live by. Our thanks go to Keith for allowing his work to be reproduced on this blog.

Podcast: The Roman Stoics with John Sellars and Peter Adamson

John Sellars and Peter Adamson discuss the Roman Stoics in the History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps

Our best evidence for Stoic practices comes from the later, or so-called ‘Roman Stoics’, such as Epictetus, Seneca and Marcus Aurelius. It is these three authors who provide our most substantial evidence for Stoicism. But who were these Stoics, and what did they write? And how were these authors¬†different from earlier Stoics? And what is it that differentiates ‘philosophy as a way of life’ from ‘philosophy’?¬†

To find out more, click here for a podcast with John Sellars, lecturer of philosophy at Birkbeck College London, in a discussion with Peter Adamson, Professor of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy at UCL London, who organises the wonderful History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps podcast series.